Leading people into vision and values

Good leaders deliberately cultivate a set of core values that support the vision and health of the group.

Look at this useful video by Werner Joubert (Pastor of Shofar Christian Church in Secunda) on the dynamic power of leading people into a shared vison and values.

Scripture

Acts 2:41-47

41 [After Peter’s first sermon on the day of Pentecost] those who received his word were baptized, and there were added that day about three thousand souls. 42 And they devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers. 43 And awe came upon every soul, and many wonders and signs were being done through the apostles. 44 And all who believed were together and had all things in common. 45 And they were selling their possessions and belongings and distributing the proceeds to all, as any had need. 46 And day by day, attending the temple together and breaking bread in their homes, they received their food with glad and generous hearts, 47 praising God and having favour with all the people. And the Lord added to their number day by day those who were being saved.

Observations and reflection questions

  1. Looking at this recording by Luke, describe what was the core practices which were demonstrated and instilled by the Apostles after these first converts were added to the church.
  2. What are the core values that underpin these core practices of the early believers?
  3. How would these core values support the vision of the early church?

Personal reflection and application questions

Leaders reinforce the cause and help create a good, healthy culture by exemplifying and propagating the vision and core values of the organization they are serving in.

  1. Consider your leadership context (church denomination, business, community project, etc).
    1. What are the stated vision and core values?
    2. What would happen if you would lead your small group or department in another direction (vision) or another culture (core values)?
    3. How much does your heart resonate with these stated vision and core values? How much do you want to accomplish that?
    4. How well does your personal leadership direction and group culture coincide with the vision and core values of the organization which you are serving?
    5. How many of the people in your small or department church or organization?
    6. To what degree has your small group or department embraced the vision and core values of your church or organization?
    7. Why is this (f) necessary?

Prayer

Search your heart in prayer and reflect on your disposition towards the group or church you are serving in.  How much are you in agreement, and is there a root of independence or rebellion in your heart?

Healing the Brokenhearted 2 – the Great Exchange

The aim of this devotional study is to personally reflect on Christ’s substitution for our suffering and provision for our restoration.

Scripture

Isaiah 53:3-5

3  He was despised and rejected by men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief; and as one from whom men hide their faces he was despised, and we esteemed him not.  4  Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; yet we esteemed him stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted.  5  But he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement [punishment] that brought us peace, and with his wounds we are healed. 6  All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all.

Observations

  1. When you read this Old Testament prophesy of the Messsiah (about 700BC), what event do you think it refers to?
  2. Reading verses 4 and 5, what is the core message the prophet wants to convey?
  3. According to this Text,
    1. what did the Messiah suffer? [hint: look at the verbs / action words]
    2. what did we gain from the Messiah’s suffering? [hint: look at the nouns]
    3. what was our behavior and condition at the time of the Messiah’s suffering?
    4. for whom was the Messiah’s substitutionary suffering?

Personal Reflections

Transgression: breaking a law/ sinning while fully aware of one’s actions.  Deliberate or conscious sin.

Iniquity: “bend in the spirit”, some spiritual flaw which manifest as bad habit, character fault, addition, etc.

  1. Considering that I am body, soul and spirit (cf 1 Thessalonians 5:23), what does this Text say the Messiah’s substitutionary suffering had accomplished:
    1. for my spirit (verse 5)
    2. for my soul (i.e. mind, will and emotions; verses 4 and 5)
    3. for my body (verse 5)
  2. Consider the statement in verse 6.
    1. What does that suggest about my own state at the time of the Messiah’s substitutionary suffering?
    2. What does it suggest about God’s intent and commitment for my own healing?
    3. What does it suggest about my responsibility in earning this healing – current and future? [hint: what do I have to do to get it?]

Application and Prayer

Jesus, the Messiah has through his vicarious suffering [on your behalf] obtained healing for your spirit, soul and body.

  • Regarding your spirit: Which iniquity was Jesus, the Messiah, crushed for that you are still in bondage for?
  • Regarding your soul: Which grief, sorrow, anxiety or confusion are you still suffering from which Jesus, the Messiah, was punished for?
  • Regarding your body: Which sickness or disease are you still suffering from which Jesus, the Messiah, was wounded for?
  1. Thank God for the gift of healing through Jesus’ suffering.
  2. Confess your belief that Jesus’ suffering was enough for your need.
  3. Pray as the Spirit leads for your complete healing.
  4. Tell a friend about this.